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As Scope of 2012 Breach Expands, LinkedIn to Again Reset Passwords for Some Users

mercredi 18 mai 2016 à 21:30

A 2012 data breach that was thought to have exposed 6.5 million hashed passwords for LinkedIn users instead likely impacted more than 117 million accounts, the company now says. In response, the business networking giant said today that it would once again force a password reset for individual users thought to be impacted in the expanded breach.

leakedinThe 2012 breach was first exposed when a hacker posted a list of some 6.5 million unique passwords to a popular forum where members volunteer or can be hired to hack complex passwords. Forum members managed to crack some the passwords, and eventually noticed that an inordinate number of the passwords they were able to crack contained some variation of “linkedin” in them.

LinkedIn responded by forcing a password reset on all 6.5 million of the impacted accounts, but it stopped there. But earlier today, reports surfaced about a sales thread on an online cybercrime bazaar in which the seller offered to sell 117 million records stolen in the 2012 breach. In addition, the paid hacked data search engine LeakedSource claims to have a searchable copy of the 117 million record database (this service said it found my LinkedIn email address in the data cache, but it asked me to pay $4.00 for a one-day trial membership in order to view the data; I declined).

Inexplicably, LinkedIn’s response to the most recent breach is to repeat the mistake it made with original breach, by once again forcing a password reset for only a subset of its users.

“Yesterday, we became aware of an additional set of data that had just been released that claims to be email and hashed password combinations of more than 100 million LinkedIn members from that same theft in 2012,” wrote Cory Scott, in a post on the company’s blog. “We are taking immediate steps to invalidate the passwords of the accounts impacted, and we will contact those members to reset their passwords. We have no indication that this is as a result of a new security breach.”

LinkedIn spokesman Hani Durzy said the company has obtained a copy of the 117 million record database, and that LinkedIn believes it to be real.

“We believe it is from the 2012 breach,” Durzy said in an email to KrebsOnSecurity. “How many of those 117m are active and current is still being investigated.”

Regarding the decision not to force a password reset across the board back in 2012, Durzy said “We did at the time what we thought was in the best interest of our member base as a whole, trying to balance security for those with passwords that were compromised while not disrupting the LinkedIn experience for those who didn’t appear impacted.”

The 117 million figure makes sense: LinkedIn says it has more than 400 million users, but reports suggest only about 25 percent of those accounts are used monthly.

Alex Holden, co-founder of security consultancy Hold Security, was among the first to discover the original cache of 6.5 million back in 2012 — shortly after it was posted to the password cracking forum InsidePro. Holden said the 6.5 million encrypted passwords were all unique, and did not include any passwords that were simple to crack with rudimentary tools or resources [full disclosure: Holden’s site lists this author as an adviser, however I receive no compensation for that role].

“These were just the ones that the guy who posted it couldn’t crack,” Holden said. “I always thought that the hacker simply didn’t post to the forum all of the easy passwords that he could crack himself.”

The top 20 most commonly used LinkedIn account passwords, according to LeakedSource.

The top 20 most commonly used LinkedIn account passwords, according to LeakedSource.

According to LeakedSource, just 50 easily guessed passwords made up more than 2.2 million of the 117 million encrypted passwords exposed in the breach.

“Passwords were stored in SHA1 with no salting,” the password-selling site claims. “This is not what internet standards propose. Only 117m accounts have passwords and we suspect the remaining users registered using FaceBook or some similarity.”

SHA1 is one of several different methods for “hashing” — that is, obfuscating and storing — plain text passwords. Passwords are “hashed” by taking the plain text password and running it against a theoretically one-way mathematical algorithm that turns the user’s password into a string of gibberish numbers and letters that is supposed to be challenging to reverse. 

The weakness of this approach is that hashes by themselves are static, meaning that the password “123456,” for example, will always compute to the same password hash. To make matters worse, there are plenty of tools capable of very rapidly mapping these hashes to common dictionary words, names and phrases, which essentially negates the effectiveness of hashing. These days, computer hardware has gotten so cheap that attackers can easily and very cheaply build machines capable of computing tens of millions of possible password hashes per second for each corresponding username or email address.

But by adding a unique element, or “salt,” to each user password, database administrators can massively complicate things for attackers who may have stolen the user database and rely upon automated tools to crack user passwords.

LinkedIn said it added salt to its password hashing function following the 2012 breach. But if you’re a LinkedIn user and haven’t changed your LinkedIn password since 2012, your password may not be protected with the added salting capabilities. At least, that’s my reading of the situation from LinkedIn’s 2012 post about the breach.

If you haven’t changed your LinkedIn password in a while, that would probably be a good idea. Most importantly, if you use your LinkedIn password at other sites, change those passwords to unique passwords. As this breach reminds us, re-using passwords at multiple sites that hold personal and/or financial information about you is a less-than-stellar idea.

Microsoft Disables Wi-Fi Sense on Windows 10

mercredi 18 mai 2016 à 15:32

Microsoft has disabled its controversial Wi-Fi Sense feature, a component embedded in Windows 10 devices that shares access to WiFi networks to which you connect with any contacts you may have listed in Outlook and Skype — and, with an opt-in — your Facebook friends.

msoptoutRedmond made the announcement almost as a footnote in its Windows 10 Experience blog, but the feature caused quite a stir when the company’s flagship operating system first debuted last summer.

Microsoft didn’t mention the privacy and security concerns raised by Wi-Fi Sense, saying only that the feature was being removed because it was expensive to maintain and that few Windows 10 users were taking advantage of it.

“We have removed the Wi-Fi Sense feature that allows you to share Wi-Fi networks with your contacts and to be automatically connected to networks shared by your contacts,” wrote Gabe Aul, corporate vice president of Microsoft’s engineering systems team. “The cost of updating the code to keep this feature working combined with low usage and low demand made this not worth further investment. Wi-Fi Sense, if enabled, will continue to get you connected to open Wi-Fi hotspots that it knows about through crowdsourcing.”

Wi-Fi Sense doesn’t share your WiFi network password per se — it shares an encrypted version of that password. But it does allow anyone in your Skype or Outlook or Hotmail contacts lists to waltz onto your Wi-Fi network — should they ever wander within range of it or visit your home (or hop onto it secretly from hundreds of yards away with a good ‘ole cantenna!).

When the feature first launched, Microsoft sought to reassure would-be Windows 10 users that their Wi-Fi password would be sent encrypted and stored encrypted — on a Microsoft server. The company also pointed out that Windows 10 users had to initially agree to share their network during the Windows 10 installation process before the feature would be turned on.

But these assurances rang hollow for many Windows users already suspicious about a feature that could share access to a user’s wireless network even after that user changed their Wi-Fi network password.

“Annoyingly, because they didn’t have your actual password, just authorization to ask the Wi-Fi Sense service to supply it on their behalf, changing your password down the line wouldn’t keep them out – Wi-Fi Sense would learn the new password directly from you and supply it for them in future,” John Zorabedian wrote for security firm Sophos.

Microsoft’s solution for those concerned required users to change the name (a.k.a. “SSID“) of their Wi-Fi network to include the text “_optout” somewhere in the network name (for example, “oldnetworknamehere_optout”).

I commend Microsoft for taking this step, if albeit belatedly. Much security is undone by ill-advised features in software and hardware that are unnecessarily enabled by default.

Carding Sites Turn to the ‘Dark Cloud’

jeudi 12 mai 2016 à 20:10

Crooks who peddle stolen credit cards on the Internet face a constant challenge: Keeping their shops online and reachable in the face of meddling from law enforcement officials, security firms, researchers and vigilantes. In this post, we’ll examine a large collection of hacked computers around the world that currently serves as a criminal cloud hosting environment for a variety of cybercrime operations, from sending spam to hosting malicious software and stolen credit card shops.

I first became aware of this botnet, which I’ve been referring to as the “Dark Cloud” for want of a better term, after hearing from Noah Dunker, director of security labs at  Kansas City-based vendor RiskAnalytics. Dunker reached out after watching a Youtube video I posted that featured some existing and historic credit card fraud sites. He asked what I knew about one of the carding sites in the video: A fraud shop called “Uncle Sam,” whose home page pictures a pointing Uncle Sam saying “I want YOU to swipe.”

The "Uncle Sam" carding shop is one of a half-dozen that reside on a Dark Cloud criminal hosting environment.

The “Uncle Sam” carding shop is one of a half-dozen that reside on a Dark Cloud criminal hosting environment.

I confessed that I knew little of this shop other than its existence, and asked why he was so interested in this particular crime store. Dunker showed me how the Uncle Sam card shop and at least four others were hosted by the same Dark Cloud, and how the system changed the Internet address of each Web site roughly every three minutes. The entire robot network, or”botnet,” consisted of thousands of hacked home computers spread across virtually every time zone in the world, he said. 

Dunker urged me not to take his word for it, but to check for myself the domain name server (DNS) settings of the Uncle Sam shop every few minutes. DNS acts as a kind of Internet white pages, by translating Web site names to numeric addresses that are easier for computers to navigate. The way this so-called “fast-flux” botnet works is that it automatically updates the DNS records of each site hosted in the Dark Cloud every few minutes, randomly shuffling the Internet address of every site on the network from one compromised machine to another in a bid to frustrate those who might try to take the sites offline.

Sure enough, a simple script was all it took to find a few dozen Internet addresses assigned to the Uncle Sam shop over just 20 minutes of running the script. When I let the DNS lookup script run overnight, it came back with more than 1,000 unique addresses to which the site had been moved during the 12 or so hours I let it run. According to Dunker, the vast majority of those Internet addresses (> 80 percent) tie back to home Internet connections in Ukraine, with the rest in Russia and Romania.

'Mr. Bin,' another carding shop hosting on the dark cloud service. A 'bin' is the "bank identification number" or the first six digits on a card, and it's mainly how fraudsters search for stolen cards.

‘Mr. Bin,’ another carding shop hosting on the dark cloud service. A ‘bin’ is the “bank identification number” or the first six digits on a card, and it’s mainly how fraudsters search for stolen cards.

“Right now there’s probably over 2,000 infected endpoints that are mostly broadband subscribers in Eastern Europe,” enslaved as part of this botnet, Dunker said. “It’s a highly functional network, and it feels kind of like a black market version of Amazon Web Services. Some of the systems appear to be used for sending spam and some are for big dynamic scaled content delivery.”

Dunker said that historic DNS records indicate that this botnet has been in operation for at least the past year, but that there are signs it was up and running as early as Summer 2014.

Wayne Crowder, director of threat intelligence for RiskAnalytics, said the botnet appears to be a network structure set up to push different crimeware, including ransomware, click fraud tools, banking Trojans and spam.

Crowder said the Windows-based malware that powers the botnet assigns infected hosts different roles, depending on the victim machine’s strengths or weaknesses: More powerful systems might be used as DNS servers, while infected systems behind home routers may be infected with a “reverse proxy,” which lets the attackers control the system remotely.

“Once it’s infected, it phones home and gets a role assigned to it,” Crowder said. “That may be to continue sending spam, host a reverse proxy, or run a DNS server. It kind of depends on what capabilities it has.”

"Popeye," another carding site hosted on the criminal cloud network.

“Popeye,” another carding site hosted on the criminal cloud network.

Indeed, this network does feel rather spammy. In my book Spam Nation, I detailed how the largest spam affiliate program on the planet at the time used a similar fast-flux network of compromised systems to host its network of pill sites that were being promoted in the junk email. Many of the domains used in those spam campaigns were two- and three-word domains that appeared to be randomly created for use in malware and spam distribution.

“We’re seeing two English words separated by a dash,” Dunker said the hundreds of hostnames found on the dark cloud network that do not appear to be used for carding shops. “It’s a very spammy naming convention.”

It’s unclear whether this botnet is being used by more than one individual or group. The variety of crimeware campaigns that RiskAnalytics has tracked operated through the network suggests that it may be rented out to multiple different cybercrooks. Still, other clues suggests the whole thing may have been orchestrated by the same gang.

For example, nearly all of the carding sites hosted on the dark cloud network — including Uncle Sam, Scrooge McDuck, Mr. Bin, Try2Swipe, Popeye, and Royaldumps — share the same or very similar site designs. All of them say that customers can look up available cards for sale at the site, but that purchasing the cards requires first contacting the proprietor of the shops directly via instant message.

All six of these shops — and only these six — are advertised prominently on the cybercrime forum prvtzone[dot]su. It is unclear whether this forum is run or frequented by the people who run this botnet, but the forum does heavily steer members interested in carding toward these six carding services. It’s unclear why, but Prvtzone has a Google Analytics tracking ID (UA-65055767) embedded in the HTML source of its page that may hold clues about the proprietors of this crime forum.

The "dumps" section of the cybercrime forum Prvtzone advertises all six of the carding domains found on the fast-flux network.

The “dumps” section of the cybercrime forum Prvtzone advertises all six of the carding domains found on the fast-flux network.

Dunker says he’s convinced it’s one group that occasionally rents out the infrastructure to other criminals.

“At this point, I’m positive that there’s one overarching organized crime operation driving this whole thing,” Dunker said. “But they do appear to be leasing parts of it out to others.”

Dunker and Crowder say they hope to release an initial report on their findings about the botnet sometime next week, but that for now the rabbit hole appears to go quite deep with this crime machine. For instance, there  are several sites hosted on the network that appear to be clones of real businesses selling expensive farm equipment in Europe, and multiple sites report that these are fake companies looking to scam the unwary.

“There are a lot of questions that this research poses that we’d like to be able to answer,” Crowder said.

For now, I’d invite anyone interested to feel free to contribute to the research. This text file contains a historic record of domains I found that are or were at one time tied to the 40 or so Internet addresses I found in my initial, brief DNS scans of this network. Here’s a larger list of some 1,024 addresses that came up when I ran the scan for about 12 hours.

If you liked this story, check out this piece about another carding forum called Joker’s Stash, which also uses a unique communications system to keep itself online and reachable to all comers.

Wendy’s: Breach Affected 5% of Restaurants

mercredi 11 mai 2016 à 14:09

Wendy’s said today that an investigation into a credit card breach at the nationwide fast-food chain uncovered malicious software on point-of-sale systems at fewer than 300 of the company’s 5,500 franchised stores. The company says the investigation into the breach is continuing, but that the malware has been removed from all affected locations.

wendysky“Based on the preliminary findings of the investigation and other information, the Company believes that malware, installed through the use of compromised third-party vendor credentials, affected one particular point of sale system at fewer than 300 of approximately 5,500 franchised North America Wendy’s restaurants, starting in the fall of 2015,” Wendy’s disclosed in their first quarter financial statement today. The statement continues:

“These findings also indicate that the Aloha point of sale system has not been impacted by this activity. The Aloha system is already installed at all Company-operated restaurants and in a majority of franchise-operated restaurants, with implementation throughout the North America system targeted by year-end 2016. The Company expects that it will receive a final report from its investigator in the near future.”

“The Company has worked aggressively with its investigator to identify the source of the malware and quantify the extent of the malicious cyber-attacks, and has disabled and eradicated the malware in affected restaurants. The Company continues to work through a defined process with the payment card brands, its investigator and federal law enforcement authorities to complete the investigation.”

“Based upon the investigation to date, approximately 50 franchise restaurants are suspected of experiencing, or have been found to have, unrelated cybersecurity issues. The Company and affected franchisees are working to verify and resolve these issues.”

The findings come as many banks and credit unions feeling card fraud pain because of the breach have been grumbling about the extent and duration of the breach. Sources at multiple financial institutions say their data indicates that some of the breached Wendy’s locations were still leaking customer card data as late as the end of March 2016 and into early April. The breach was first disclosed on this blog on January 27, 2016.

“Our ongoing investigation into unusual payment card activity at some Wendy’s restaurants is being led by a third party PFI and is proceeding as expeditiously as possible,” Wendy’s spokesman Bob Bertini said in response to questions about the duration of the breach at some stores. “As you are aware, our investigator is required to follow certain protocols in this type of comprehensive investigation and this takes time. Adding to the complexity is the fact that most Wendy’s restaurants are owned and operated by independent franchisees.”

Adobe, Microsoft Push Critical Updates

mardi 10 mai 2016 à 23:37

Adobe has issued security updates to fix weaknesses in its PDF Reader and Cold Fusion products, while pointing to an update to be released later this week for its ubiquitous Flash Player browser plugin. Microsoft meanwhile today released 16 update bundles to address dozens of security flaws in Windows, Internet Explorer and related software.

Microsoft’s patch batch includes updates for “zero-day” vulnbrokenwindowserabilities (flaws that attackers figure out how to exploit before before the software maker does) in Internet Explorer (IE) and in Windows. Half of the 16 patches that Redmond issued today earned its “critical” rating, meaning the vulnerabilities could be exploited remotely through no help from the user, save for perhaps clicking a link, opening a file or visiting a hacked or malicious Web site.

According to security firm Shavlik, two of the Microsoft patches tackle issues that were publicly disclosed prior to today’s updates, including bugs in IE and the Microsoft .NET Framework.

Anytime there’s a .NET Framework update available, I always uncheck those updates to install and then reboot and install the .NET updates; I’ve had too many .NET update failures muddy the process of figuring out which update borked a Windows machine after a batch of patches to do otherwise, but your mileage may vary.

On the Adobe side, the pending Flash update fixes a single vulnerability that apparently is already being exploited in active attacks online. However, Shavlik says there appears to be some confusion about how many bugs are fixed in the Flash update.

“If information gleaned from [Microsoft’s account of the Flash Player update] MS16-064 is accurate, this Zero Day will be accompanied by 23 additional CVEs, with the release expected on May 12th,” Shavlik wrote. “With this in mind, the recommendation is to roll this update out immediately.”

brokenflash-a

Adobe says the vulnerability is included in Adobe Flash Player 21.0.0.226 and earlier versions for Windows, Macintosh, Linux, and Chrome OS, and that the flaw will be fixed in a version of Flash to be released May 12.

As far as Flash is concerned, the smartest option is probably best to hobble or ditch the program once and for all — and significantly increase the security of your system in the process. I’ve got more on that approach (as well as slightly less radical solutions ) in A Month Without Adobe Flash Player.

If you use Adobe Reader to display PDF documents, you’ll need to update that, too. Alternatively, consider switching to another reader that is perhaps less targeted. Adobe Reader comes bundled with a number of third-party software products, but many Windows users may not realize there are alternatives, including some good free ones. For a time I used Foxit Reader, but that program seems to have grown more bloated with each release. My current preference is Sumatra PDF; it is lightweight (about 40 times smaller than Adobe Reader) and quite fast.

Finally, if you run a Web site that in any way relies on Adobe’s Cold Fusion technology, please update your software soon. Cold Fusion vulnerabilities have traditionally been targeted by cyber thieves to compromise countless online shops.

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